Home Arts & Entertainment ‘Cheragi Art Show Bhinno’ incorporates contemporary art into modern architecture

‘Cheragi Art Show Bhinno’ incorporates contemporary art into modern architecture

by MD Ashraful Islam

Ever since its inception in 2012, Jog Art Space has been working with artistes and viewers to create a space that allows cultural conversations to bloom. By allowing people to interact and connect, it has blended various art forms into a multidisciplinary street art show. Their collective exhibition, entitled “Cheragi Art Show Bhinno” is currently underway in “Chobi Mela Shunno”, at DrikPath Bhobon, Panthapath.

Curated by Shourav Zaman, the works intend to provide a space for artists and thinkers to interact. “We have tried to create an organic blend of all art forms. Through Cheragi, we want to use art to create a sense of togetherness. ‘Bhinno’ signifies the differences in presentation,” Shourav shared. The street art show does not restrict viewers in a cubic gallery. Subsequently, participating in “Chobi Mela” while maintaining the individuality of each artist’s work, was a major challenge for Shourav. “We have incorporated contemporary art into modern architecture, while trying to highlight the speciality of each medium,” he added.

History remains eternal through art and stamps are one of the best examples of preserving history. Through “25 August”, Kauser Haider shares the stories of Rohingyas, who entered Bangladesh on August 25, 2017. “Living to tell the tale” by Arafat Siraji is a collection of personal photographs that depict the despair and vulnerability of a family.

Several artworks on display address gender-based discrimination. “Things We Skip!” by Asrafun Nahar Ruba features artworks that share the experiences of women. Following a similar theme, Yuvraj Zahed Ali Chowdhury’s “Male Pregnancy” reverses the gender roles and raises questions about the natural division of labour. “Amorar Akkhayn” or “Departed Soul” by Dilara Begum Jolly includes two videos shot inside Mahamaya Dalim Bhaban, a building which was used as a torture centre during 1971. While narrating the historical significance of the venue, the artist rediscovers the power of reinterpretation. On the other hand, “Deher Akkhayn” or “As the Body Speaks” is a collection of artworks made using materials like quilts, blouses, and petticoats. Using the traditional nokshi kantha, she has tried to portray the signs of pain and sufferings of women.

“Madness is a Very Slippery Terrain” is a poetry recitation by Emilie Flower, Ruth Kelly and Susan Nalugwa Kiguli. The installation features poems by Susan and Ruth playing behind a wall and the voices are lit by Emilie’s projections. An installation, entitled “Reverse”, by Nusrat Jahan Shaown provides an amazing sound experience to visitors. By playing with the nature of various sounds, the artist has layered them carefully in order to provide a new experience. Additionally, Tanmoy Mitra, Shantanu Chowdhury and Kiriti Saha’s group installation, “Evolution, searching & reflection”, describe the constant evolution of art in light of changes in the society. Revolving around the themes of human dilemma and the perception about right and wrong, the installation is made with unused materials.

Politics and protests have always been a popular theme among artists. Razib Dutta’s “The Unheard” is a brilliant exhibit of posters saying ekta boka lokher daat. ekta, which challenges the prenotions of our society. Similarly, “Yet Untitled” by Shah Newaz Shaikat utilises a simplistic approach to address larger problems. The 2D animations included in the exhibition focuses on contemporary social and political issues.

Rydwan Ahmed’s “Mausoleum” is an interesting exhibition that features art on brick walls. He has used the bricks to imply the state of casteism and the objects represent the possibilities of their future. “Sohojpattho” by Nuzzhat Tabassum is conveys messages in the form of stories, following the format of Ballosikkha, a book of moral stories. Najmun Nahar Keya’s “Kintsugu Dhaka 2020” is a collection of architectural artworks that blends the antiquity of Old Dhaka with Japanese art techniques.

“Clairvoyance” by artist Sharad Das describes the mechanism of vision. It consists of an animation of an eye looking at the sky through the cracks and holes of the building. The vision of this eye is fixed and is enveloped by several other eyes trying to follow its line of sight. Smita Purkayastha’s exhibit, “Why am I playing to win, if I am just living to die?”, is another fascinating installation consisting of a regular carrom board with emoji coins. The board features drawings of people and the emojis to denote how human beings play with other’s minds during the course of life.

Inspired by life amidst a pandemic, Kawsar Mia’s “Life of Red Zone” features his experiences in forms of composition and lines. Lastly, “A Walk Of Light” by A.B.M Saifuzzaman is a series of black and white photographs taken while playing with natural light. “Cheragi Art Show Bhinno” will be open to visitors till tomorrow, from 11 am to 8 pm.

 

 

 

 



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